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Rev. James Calvin Scivally

Rev. James Calvin Scivally

Male 1852 - 1932  (80 years)

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  • Name Rev. James Calvin Scivally 
    Prefix Rev. 
    Born 4 Jun 1852  Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 16 Jul 1932  Vinson, Harmon, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Cave Creek Cemetery, Vinson, Harmon, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Newspaper article about Reverend James Calvin Scivally remembering an Indian attack:
      The Ravia Tribune, 14 July 1904" Ravia, Johnston County, Indian Territort
      TRUE STORIES OF THE FRONTIER
      We told you in our other letter we would tell you of some murders.
      In January 1874 I moved with two brothers and two sisters 15 miles northwest of Decatur and settled on Briar Ranch near where the town of Alvord now stands. There were three other families living on the little creek besides us, Mr. Huff, Mr. Marr and Mr. Welch. Then there were no more settlements between us and Decatur, a distance of 15 miles. It was 8 miles east to where any one lived, but along the road from Decatur to Audubon there were some few people living on Black and Catlet Creek, and near Audubon was the Ball settlement. Myself and brothers put in a farm on Bell County school land. There was lots of game in that county at that time. Why, Mr., Editor, the deer eat up your Watermelons and sweet potato vines. Well everything went on nicely until August 24. That morning I got up, eat my breakfast and went down in the field about 400 years to get my team to go to work, but when I saw three men riding toward them. I supposed they were some men from Decatur full of booze and had made their horses jump the fence. But to my astonishment I saw they were Comanche Indians. I went back to the house and reported. We went into the house and shut the doors, we took our axes in. I told my brothers we would do what we could, for I knew they would kill us. About the time we got in the house Mr. Huff came riding up and asked me if we knew the Indians were all around us. I told him I did, that they had got my horses, (two mules and one horse). At this time the Indians began shooting at Huff. He said he was afraid they would kill his horses. I told him I cared nothing about the horses, but was afraid they would kill his folks. He said he would try to go home. I told him he could not get home for the Indians would kill him before he could get there, for it was only about 200 yards to his house and 36 Indians with 175 horses, though I told him if he wanted to go I would not hinder him, but if he went and got the Indians after him I would kill him for my sisters were depending upon me to defend them. So he got on his horse and went to the Baker settlement. Now his family consisted of Mrs. Huff and two grown daughters. Mr. Huff had fed his horses on the north side of the house, having no yard fence his wagon was close to the house. In cutting the horses from the wagon they saw there was no man present so they went at their fiendish work by first committing an outrage on the girls then shooting and scalping them. Now I had done a very foolish thing in loaning my Winchester rifle to a man to go hunting. If I had had my gun I could have run them off but I had nothing but axes and an old shotgun with both locks off, so I could do nothing but watch the Indians do their hellish work and wait my own fate, as I expected them to kill us as soon as they got through their work at Huff?s. Minutes seemed hours but the time finally came when five of the Indians rode up to my yard fence. I stood and looked out through a crack (our house being a log house). I then got my hammerless shotgun, aimed it through the crack and pointed it toward them. They jabbered to each other awhile then turned around rode off and left me gladly disappointed.
      Now some people say a sinner has no right to pray but I believe any sinner will pray when he knows he is going to be killed and that I now see. After the Indians finished their work and left I waited till I thought they were gone then I went to the Huff residence to behold the awfullest scene I ever witnessed. Mrs. Huff was under the floor, she was crippled and had to go on a crutch, and I suppose she had raised a plank, the floor being laid down loose. She had been shot twice and scalped and her clothing tore off her. I got her from under the floor and straightened her out. Mollie the oldest girl was lying in front of the door on her face with a side saddle on her; she was also as nude as she came into the world. She was scalped and her skull broken in and her brains running out, also the blood running from several places on the thighs where the Indians had stuck their spears. I weepingly picked up her body and carried it into the house. Poor girl; just the night before this awful tragedy I came up from the field with her and her and her sister hauling a load of corn I told her she had better not be out at night, for the Indians might get her. She laughed and said she was too pretty, they would not kill her, but alas, alas! such was a frontier life. Peace to her ashes, and may heavenly watcher guard her grave. Pallas, the youngest girl was east of the house under a tree. I suppose she had tried to get away. She had been shot, the ball going in under the left shoulder blade and out through the left breast going through her heart. She was not scalped. She had a Testament in one hand and a case-knife in the other. I carried her body into the house to keep the hogs from eating her.
    • "Oklahoma Annual Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church, South"

      "Rev J C Scivally

      In the passing of Rev. J C Scivally , which occurred at the home of a relative near Mangum, Oklahoma, on the morning of July 16, 1932. The Methodist Church lost a circuit rider of the old type.
      He belonged to robust class if men who laid the foundation of our Methodism in this state. He was not one of the first to come to the Indian Mission Conference, for he did not appear until 1884,
      At which time he was admitted on trial at White Bead Hill.

      For well nigh forty years the real pioneers had been penetrating the hitherto crude and untouched settlements, and yet Brother Scivally began his work in fields unlike any we have today.
      The Country was rough, and roads were crudely laid out and rarely or never improved. The schools were of the most elementary type, and no such thing was known as a man owning his home.

      It was like a story of the Old West to sit and hear him tell of the experiences of himself and family in those earlier days. Most of us would hesitate long before we would willingly consent to be sent to the fields he regarded as a great privilege and opportunity.

      Twelve years ago, this writer held funeral of his wife and on seventeenth day of July, 1932, assisted by his Presiding Elder, rev. E A Read and his Pastor Rev T H Ward and Rev R B Moreland and C W NcNeeley, we held his funeral at Vinson, Oklahoma, and laid his body to rest beside that of his wife in the same cemetery at Vinson

      He was born in Tennessee February 4, 1852, and at his death was slightly more than eighty years and five months old and here we pause until the dawn of another day

      J W Sims
    • Rev. James Calvin Scivally's granddaughter stated that at his funeral the cars were four miles long.
    Person ID I11189  The Family Tree
    Last Modified 28 Aug 2014 

    Family Martha Ann "Mattie" Martin,   b. 5 Aug 1852, Tishomingo, Tishomingo, Mississippi Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Feb 1920, Vinson, Harmon, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years) 
    Married 19 Nov 1876  Wise County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Andrew Scivally,   b. 6 Feb 1881, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1899, Mannsville, Johnston, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 17 years)
    +2. Oscar Moses "Jack" Scivally,   b. 20 Feb 1884, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jan 1950, San Antonio, Bexar, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
    +3. James Hardy "Uncle Hardy" Scivally,   b. 2 Sep 1886, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Jul 1966, Marietta, Love, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
    +4. Mazeppa Guy "Guy" Scivally,   b. 8 Feb 1889, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Aug 1953, Riverside County, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)
    +5. Eunice Marian Scivally,   b. 2 Sep 1893, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 May 1953, Los Angeles County, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years)
    +6. Margaret Ural Scivally,   b. 9 Feb 1895, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Feb 1977, Van Nuys, Los Angeles, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
    Last Modified 6 Aug 2014 
    Family ID F3723  Group Sheet

  • Photos
    Rev. James Calvin Scivally and Martha Ann 'Mattie' Martin Scivally Family
    Rev. James Calvin Scivally and Martha Ann "Mattie" Martin Scivally Family
    Back Row: Andrew Scivally; Middle Row, Left to Right: Martha Ann "Mattie" Martin Scivally, Oscar Moses "Jack" Scivally, and Rev. James Calvin Scivally holding Eunice Marian Scivally; Front Row, Left to Right: James Hardy Scivally, Margaret Ural Scivally, and Mazeppa Guy Scivally.
    Rev. James Calvin Scivally 1
    Rev. James Calvin Scivally 1
    Rev. James Calvin Scivally 2
    Rev. James Calvin Scivally 2

    Headstones
    Scivally, James Calvin and Martha Ann 'Mattie' Martin Headstone
    Scivally, James Calvin and Martha Ann "Mattie" Martin Headstone
    White Flat Cemetery, Mangum, Greer, Oklahoma. The cemetery is located in Mangum, Oklahoma on the corner of East Lincoln Street and South Pennsylvania Avenue.



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